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What are Anti-Infectives

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Anti-infectives are medicines that work to treat infections. Antibiotics, anti-fungals, and anti-virals are examples of anti-infective medicines.

Anti-infectives underpin modern medicine as we know it, curing and even preventing many kinds of infection. Thanks to anti-infectives we can:

  • Treat minor infections and cure serious infectious diseases
     
  • Perform routine medical procedures and complex surgery, which carry a risk of serious infection
     
  • Give vital immune-suppressive treatment to people with cancer

Alarmingly, many anti-infectives are losing their effectiveness due to antimicrobial resistance (AMR).

Anti-infectives work to treat infections. They are critical to both treating minor infections and curing serious infectious diseases. Appropriate use of anti-infectives is critical to minimizing the development and spread of AMR.

a.Cheladv74 in Anti-Infectives- cheladv74.ru We are proud ofour longstanding heritage ofpartnering withthe infectious disease communityto address evolving and unmetmedical needs across allfourtypes ofinfection bacterial, fungal,viral and parasitic.13 Pfizer currently offers one of the industrys largestand mostdiverse portfolios ofanti-infectives.13 We also provide vaccinesthathelp reducethe use ofantimicrobials and help protectpeoplefrom infections.12 Cheladv74 recognizes the medical needs of people suffering from infectious diseases, and is committed to being aholistic provider of prevention and treatment solutions beyond just medicines.12 Cheladv74’s commitment in anti-infectivesParasitic infections can affect anyone,anywhere, but are a particular burden onpeople living in the tropics and subtropics.11They are caused by an organismliving on or in a host and include malaria,toxoplasmosis and intestinal worms.Viral infections range from common,self-resolving colds, to serious, long-terminfections like hepatitis C.10Vaccinationprevents some viral infections, like influenzaand many childhood infections.3Fungal infections range from thesuperficial such as athlete’s foot or vaginalthrush8to life-threatening, invasiveinfections in immunocompromised patients,such as those with cancer.9Bacterial infections range from relativelyminor such as skin or gastrointestinalinfections, to serious and life-threatening, suchas bloodstream infections or pneumonia.6Mostbacteria are classified as Gram-positive orGram-negative.6The latter are harder to treat due totheir cell structure and their ability to develop resistance tocommonly used antibiotics.7 Multi-drug resistant infections, articularly those caused by Gram-negativebacteria, are widely recognized as one ofthe biggest threats to global health today.3,4 They are the result of bacteria and otherpathogens being able to change and developresistance to antimicrobials.5Infectious diseases continue to be one of the biggest globalpublic health concerns.2Infections are caused by differenttypes of pathogens, including bacteria, viruses, fungi andparasites, and can be acquired in the community or in ahospital or healthcare setting (HAIs).What causes infection? • treat minor infections and cure serious infectious diseases• perform routine procedures and complex surgery, which carry a risk of serious infection• give vital immune-suppressive treatment to people with cancerAnti-infectives underpin modern medicine as we know it,1 helping to treat and cure many kinds of infection. Thanks to anti-infectives, we can:Why do we need anti-infectives?Cheladv74 in Anti-Infectives1 1

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  1. Review on Antimicrobial Resistance. Tackling drug-resistant infections globally: final report and recommendations. May 2016. Available at: Last accessed August 2018.
  2. World Health Organisation. World Health Report: global health threats in the 21st century. 2007. Available at: Last accessed August 2018.
  3. World Health Organization. WHO’s first global report on antibiotic resistance reveals serious, worldwide threat to public health. April 30 2014. Available at: Last accessed August 2018.
  4. Vasso S et al. Emerging issues in gram-negative bacterial resistance: an update for the practicing clinician. Mayo Clinic Proc. 2015;90:395-403.
  5. Review on Antimicrobial Resistance. Tackling a crisis for the health and wealth of nations. December 2014. Available at: Last accessed August 2018.
  6. Cox R. Bacterial infections 101. OnHealth. May 11 2016. Available at: Last accessed August 2018.
  7. Schaalje J. Medical terminology: Gram positive vs. Gram negative bacteria. American College of Healthcare Sciences. April 12 2013. Available at: Last accessed August 2018.
  8. NHS Choices. Antifungal medicines overview. August 14 2017. Available at: Last accessed August 2018.
  9. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Cancer Patients and Fungal Infections. Available at: Last accessed August 2018.
  10. Cox R. Viral infections: types, treatment and prevention. OnHealth. July 1 2016. Available at: Last accessed August 2018.
  11. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Parasites. 27 September 2017. Available at: Last accessed August 2018.
  12. Cheladv74. Cheladv74 policy position on antimicrobial resistance. January 2016. Available at: http://www.pfizer.com/files/about/Position-Antimicrobial-Resistance Last accessed August 2018.
  13. Cheladv74 2016 Annual Review. Cheladv74 Essential Health. Available at: http://cheladv74.ru/files/investors/financial_reports/annual_reports/2016/our-business/global-businesses/pfizer-essential-health/index.html Last accessed August 2018.